Oct 02

Coming Soon From Fred Staff: The United States Marshal: A Posse For The Marshal

 

Oct 02

REBLOG: How To Write A Bestseller With Western Writer Scott Harris: Mile 11: Stephen King

Scott Harris. An enigma in the Western writing business. A man who has scored hits with each of his releases. There isn’t enough room to name them all here… and now we are presenting his thoughts about writing. Each one of these blogs will give you the thoughts of a bestseller… directly from his mouth! Read on and discover more about Harris’ writing world…

 

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Stephen King’s book on writing is called, you guessed it, “On Writing.” Some consider it a classic of the “writers helping other writers” genre. I don’t actually know if that’s a genre, but it should be, and King’s book is a good one. While he’s best known for his horror, fantasy and supernatural books, none of which I’ve read, his advice here is invaluable and universal, crossing genre lines. It is as valuable to Western writers as it is to those who plan to write horror books.

His book is part autobiographical, part novel and part a writer’s roadmap.

It is broken into five sections.

  • C.V. – the autobiographical part of his journey.
  • What Writing Is – the title of this section could have been expanded to add “and Why It’s Important.”
  • Toolbox – the nuts and bolts of grammar, style, vocabulary, structure, etc. Not necessarily fun, except for the quirky among us, but necessary.
  • On Writing – cautionary and inspirational thoughts for those new to the craft.
  • On Living: A Postscript – details on the horrific accident King was in and how it impacted his life and his writing.

It is hard to pull a few things out of “On Writing” and highlight them, because so many of the pieces of advice, passages and candid insights deserve to be highlighted, I could simply yellow out the entire book and post it. But there are laws that forbid me to do so, so I’ve picked out a few of my favorites…

On criticism: In many ways, Eula-Bealah prepared me for literary criticism. After having a two-hundred-pound babysitter fart on your face and yell Pow!, The Village Voice holds few terrors. (If you like this line, you’ll love the book.)

On story ideas: …good story ideas seem to come quite literally from nowhere, sailing at you right out of the empty sky…

On adverbs: I insist that you use the adverb in dialog attribution only in the rarest and most special of occasions.

More adverbs: All I ask is that you do as well as you can, and remember that, while to write adverbs is human, to write he said or she said is divine.

On improving: …it is possible, with lots of hard work, dedication, and timely help, to make a good writer out of a merely competent one.

On “The Great Commandment”: Read a lot, write a lot. (This might be the most obvious, most important and most overlooked piece of advice in the entire book.)

On descriptions: …if you have a feeling you can’t describe, you just might be, I don’t know, kind of like, my sense of it is, maybe in the wrong fucking class. (This is pulled from my favorite story in the book, and at least for me, it was laugh out loud, blow milk through your nose, lose a little bladder control funny.)

On the “Magic Secrets of Writing”: …there aren’t any—bummer, huh?

If you decide to never write another word, this book is still very much worth your time to read. If you do plan on writing, or better yet, are in the middle of a project, this book is borderline indispensable.

I wish you good writing, and if you have a question or something you’d like to share, send me an email at Scott@scottharriswest.com.

Thank you, enjoy and keep writing!

CATCH THE LATEST SCOTT HARRIS WESTERN BESTSELLER!

Click here to download your copy

The latest adventure from one of the most exciting Western authors of today! This is “Mojave Massacre” from Scott Harris! A sure-fire reader pleaser!

Brock, Sophie and Huck are still living with the Havasupai at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. But their lives are threatened by the murderous and vengeful Paiute, and Brock and Huck, seeing no alternative, race one hundred miles to a small trading outpost, hoping to buy the rifles that will give them a chance against the much larger Paiute forces.

They stumble across four slaughtered Hopi Indians, track down the murderers, and find help in very unexpected places from friends – new and old.

The final battle is brutal, bloody and decisive.

Mojave Massacre is the exciting second book in the new Grand Canyon trilogy and the fifth book in the best-selling Brock Clemons Western series, following the tremendously successful Dry Springs trilogy. Click here to download your copy of this exciting new book!

Oct 01

Cowboy Storyteller GP Hutchinson Holds A Brand New Copy Of His Latest Western Novel

A bushwhacked Wild-West-show entrepreneur must prove he’s no mere dime-novel hero; either that or lose everything he holds dear.

Cimarron Jack Wheatley is just wrapping up a tremendously successful first tour with his very own highly acclaimed “Real Wild West Extravaganza” when his show is stricken by a rapid succession of oddly coincidental setbacks—injuries, formerly satisfied troupe members suddenly quitting, and then a catastrophic train wreck. It soon becomes apparent that Jack isn’t simply experiencing a run of bad luck. Someone aims to ruin the business he has invested his entire life into—and to end his life if he puts up a fight. Now, everything that Cimarron Jack is supposed to have represented as a symbol of Wild West heroism in the show, he must actually be, in the deadly reality of chasing down answers and outlaws.

 

Sep 28

REBLOG: Forum Featuring Russ Towne

One of the most promising Western authors of today– Russ Towne– has been interviewed for “Forum” by Scott Harris. This interview should give you some good, solid reasons to go chase down a Russ Towne novel– he’s one of the best– lets read this interview! You can read the original interview from Forum by clicking here!

 

Read the original interview by clicking here

When — and why — did you first fall in love with Westerns?

When I was young, TV was full of Westerns. I loved “Cheyenne,” “Rin Tin Tin,” “The Rifleman” and others. I love the adventure and the way people thought and handled things back then. Good people helped and protected each other, and when they did, the bad guys were outnumbered and beaten, and when they didn’t, bad things happened until a hero stepped up took them on. I love the messages such shows give to people of all ages. I use present tense because I still watch the old shows despite many of them being 60 to 70 years old. They are morality tales I never tire of seeing.

Who are your three favorite Western writers?

Besides you, I like Zane Grey, Louis L’Amour, Owen Wister, who wrote “The Virginian,” David Webb Peoples, who wrote “Unforgiven,” and Carl Foreman, who wrote the screenplay for “High Noon.” I know that’s more than three, but they are my favorite Western writers. They each beautifully describe the cultural mores of their era, the human condition, loyalty or lack thereof, and courage or cowardice. They had a realistic feel to them and in quite different ways helped me to better understand and appreciate the land, the people and the era.

Which Western do you wish you’d written?

“Unforgiven.” I love the quirky and colorful yet believable characters, “feel” of the times, action, story, humor, drama, grittiness, many quotable quotes, and the ending that explains what happened to the protagonist and his children. Even minor characters had quirks that added to the sensory buffet.

What is the most recent Western you’ve read?

Several of your Brock Clemmons books, some of them twice.

The “Desert Island” question. What are your three favorite Western books?

“The Virginian,” “The Sacketts” series and “Robbers’ Roost.” I like how simply people thought and spoke in those times. There was time to think, and places of great beauty and solitude in which to do the thinking. There wasn’t a lot of blabbering and wasted noise or broken promises.

What are your three favorite Western movies?

“Unforgiven,” “High Noon” and “The Shootist.” I explained most of the reasons in my answer to your second question. I also love the actors and actresses. “The Shootist” in particular had many extraordinary stars in it. I love that John Wayne refused to follow the script and shoot a man in the back, saying something to the effect that, “John Wayne never shot anyone in the back and isn’t going to start now.” I believe the way the script was changed made for a more powerful movie and ending.

Of the books you’ve written, which is your favorite — and why?

“A Bloody Day in Destiny.” It was my first book of Western tales and features some of my favorite stories I’d written to that date. These stories whet my appetite to write more:

The past comes calling with a six-gun and a score to settle, and there’s no place to hide in “A Bloody Day in Destiny.”

An unwelcome sleeping companion holds the key to survival when two vengeful brothers catch up to the man who shot their brother in “I Hate Snakes.”

A lonely rancher gets much more than he bargained for when a beautiful woman with a secret past responds to his ad for a wife in “Mail-Order Bride.”

An aging marshal faces a desperate young killer with nothing left to lose in “Peace.”

What is the most recent Western you’ve written?

I’ve just written two more, both of which should be released in September 2018 or sooner: “A Bullet in the Neck” and “The Grizzly Creek Massacre.”

Here’s a taste of the stories readers will find in “A Bullet in the Neck”:

“Gold Fever” – Greed leads to violence, betrayal and death, as honest, hard-working gold miners discover a traitor in their midst when they must confront a killer and his vicious gang of murdering thieves.

“Big Dream Ranch” – An ambitious man works to overcome many obstacles as he strives to make his big dream come true, unaware that he has yet to face the greatest obstacle of all.

“Mary’s Medicine” – A dying man is awakened by a gun-toting stranger in his bedroom who has a terrible story to tell that might just save his life.

“Annie Davenport and Dr. Hartlee’s Miracle Headache Cure” – A series of tragedies push a young woman toward a terrible choice — marry a man she detests to save her ranch and ensure the survival of her young son and herself, or risk everything to keep her freedom — and her time is running out.

And here’s a taste of the stories in “The Grizzly Creek Massacre”:

“The Grizzly Creek Massacre” – Four young men in the cavalry witness a mutiny and brutal murder and are chased by their sadistic sergeant and his men through hostile Indian Territory until they make a desperate stand at Grizzly Creek.

“Hoodwinked” – A crooked rancher tries to hoodwink a young man into buying a nearly worthless piece of land.

“Desperation” – A four-year-long drought tests the mettle of two friends and neighbors as they face the complete loss of a lifetime of work, and perhaps much worse.

“Saddle Buddies” – Sam and Joe met in Saint Louis, both headed toward gold country. Their two thousand mile journey is full of hardship and danger: Indian attacks, snakes (human and reptilian), sleeping in the rain, fording swollen rivers, slogging through mud, and early snowstorms.

“Fool’s Gold” – A beautiful woman and her fiancé appear to create the perfect scam for fleecing whole mining camps full of lonely miners out of their hard-earned gold, but they learn the hard way that betrayal can be a two-headed coin.

Can you tell us anything about your next book?

It’s about a young man who promises a desperate, beautiful woman that he will save her young sister and others from being kidnapped by a ruthless gang of cutthroats and forced into a life of prostitution. The trouble is the young man is a city slicker fresh off the boat from Boston who can barely ride a horse, can’t shoot a gun worth beans and almost immediately finds himself naked, on foot, without guns, at night, walking barefoot cross country in an area he’s unfamiliar with. If he survives that, he’s got to race to a small village in Mexico in time to warn the young girls before the gang gets to them, but he doesn’t speak a word of Spanish. What could possibly go wrong?

If you could go back in time, what would be the time and place in the Old West you’d like to have lived in for a year?  

The California Gold Rush Gold Country. I would have loved to supply provisions to the miners, from picks and gold pans to food, tents and clothing. I performed a similar role during the Dotcom Boom and found the experience to be helpful, appreciated and quite rewarding.

Is there a question you wish I’d asked?  

Of all possible genres, why do you love writing Westerns?

The answer?

The Old West era was full of adventurous, courageous, hardy, strong, colorful, diverse, independent-minded, quirky and self-sufficient pioneers. It was a time of immense possibilities, clashing cultures, few rules, danger, action and adventure. The smallest decision could lead to life and death struggles. A man’s word was his bond, and an honorable man would do whatever it took to keep his word or die trying. Though far from an easy period, it was a simpler time, with fewer shades of gray. Ideas for Western tales often flow from my mind faster than I can capture them. I often even dream Western tales and edit the action as my dreams progress.

Sep 26

NEW RELEASE: The Legend of Sam Tally: A Western Adventure From Jim Burnett!

This is the exciting next installment in the “Callers Spring Ranch Western series.” Jim Burnett offers up a Western salute to those men of the cloth who spread the good word.

Several years ago, I visited The Cove in Ashville, North Carolina, the Christian Conference Center owned and operated by the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, and the only thing more breathtaking than the pristine campus was the reality that God used one man to preach to 215 million people in 185 different countries. The memorabilia of past crusades on six different continents told a story of its own. The masses of people who were touched through the ministry of Billy Graham made me weep. It also caused me to recommit myself to living for God’s glory. This experience started me on a journey that culminated in the writing of “The Legend of Sam Tally.” With the recent passing of Reverend Graham, this book is a fitting way to celebrate his accomplishments for the Kingdom of God.

The Legend of Sam Tally is a western tribute to a spiritual giant, a hero of the Christian faith, and a man whose soul burned with the desire to see other souls come to faith and freedom in Jesus Christ. You will see so many familiar characteristics in Sam’s life and ministry that you have seen in Billy Graham’s, with several exceptions of course.

Follow the knife-throwing preacher, Tally, to the cow towns and boomtowns of the west where he confronts the atrocities of his day with the good news. Experience the powerful, life-changing Gospel take effect in the lives of people like Scar-faced Shayla, a saloon girl whose disfigured face and wounded spirit led her to believe her life was hopeless and would never be any better than it was.

When you have finished reading this book, I hope you will be more resolved than ever to live for God’s glory and His pleasure, as Sam Tally and Billy Graham were. Let your light shine. Purchase your copy by clicking here.

Sep 25

REBLOG: How To Write A Bestseller With Western Writer Scott Harris: Mile 10: Be There!

Scott Harris. An enigma in the Western writing business. A man who has scored hits with each of his releases. There isn’t enough room to name them all here… and now we are presenting his thoughts about writing. Each one of these blogs will give you the thoughts of a bestseller… directly from his mouth! Read on and discover more about Harris’ writing world…

 

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If you read the previous post, “Mile 9,” you’ve hopefully written your first line. If so, congratulations! Now it’s time for the second line and to put some serious thought to your characters.

I stole the title of this Trail Notes from James Patterson, one of the world’s best-selling authors. When talking about bringing life to his characters, he uses the phrase “be there,” meaning crawl into the skin of your characters, understand the best you can what they are going through, feeling and thinking, and then bring that to the reader.

The more the reader believes that you know what you’re writing about, whether they are aware of that belief or not, the more they will enjoy and immerse themself in your story. So, if you want your reader committed to your story, you commit to it.

If you’re going to write about a freezing night in the Rockies, spend a freezing night in the Rockies. And if you can’t make that happen, at least step outside for an hour in a T-shirt on a cold night.

Go 24 hours without food or water, and write about what that first sip of water or bite of food tastes like. Maybe even cook it over an open fire and describe the smells and the stomach pains as you wait for it to cook.

Spend a day in a saddle and see how sore and tired you are. Try saddling your own horse, picking its hooves, and rubbing it down with grass or burlap.

Build a fire on a cold night, maybe with the wind blowing hard. Use matches and not a lighter. Share the frustration when it won’t start and what it feels like when the kindling catches. Let your reader know how the fire warms the side facing the fire, but how your back side stays cold.

Walk, alone, for an hour at night. It can be as easy as picking a safe park, but do it after the lights are off. See if you don’t have a heightened sense of awareness, if you don’t jump at unusual or unexpected sounds and maybe even see a thing or two in the shadows that brings you pause. The people you’re writing about — and for — had and have those exact same emotions.

Let the reader smell the coffee boiling and taste that first sip after a long, hard, cold day. Wrap both hands around a hot mug and share how it feels, how you bring it close to your nose to capture every smell, how the steam curls slowly upward until being swept away by a light breeze.

Fire a gun. If your characters, good or bad, do, so should you. Before you write “the gun bucked in his hand,” find out what you’re talking about. And when you’re sighting in on the target, imagine it’s a man, with his gun drawn, ready to shoot at you.

Many, if not most, of these experiences are no different now than they were 150 years ago. The need for food, water, shelter and warmth has never changed. Bring your reader into your world with these shared needs and experiences, and your story will resonate deeply and richly.

Not only will the scenes involving the things discussed above be more realistic and believable, but they will lay a foundation of credibility for your entire story.

And yes, since you’re writing a Western, try eating a plate of cold, canned beans for dinner one night.

I wish you good writing, and if you have a question or something you’d like to share, send me an email at Scott@scottharriswest.com.

Thank you, enjoy and keep writing!

 

CATCH THE LATEST SCOTT HARRIS WESTERN BESTSELLER!

Click here to download your copy

The latest adventure from one of the most exciting Western authors of today! This is “Mojave Massacre” from Scott Harris! A sure-fire reader pleaser!

Brock, Sophie and Huck are still living with the Havasupai at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. But their lives are threatened by the murderous and vengeful Paiute, and Brock and Huck, seeing no alternative, race one hundred miles to a small trading outpost, hoping to buy the rifles that will give them a chance against the much larger Paiute forces.

They stumble across four slaughtered Hopi Indians, track down the murderers, and find help in very unexpected places from friends – new and old.

The final battle is brutal, bloody and decisive.

Mojave Massacre is the exciting second book in the new Grand Canyon trilogy and the fifth book in the best-selling Brock Clemons Western series, following the tremendously successful Dry Springs trilogy. Click here to download your copy of this exciting new book!

Sep 24

New From Michael Haden: ‘Timber: U.S. Marshal: The Guns of Dukes and Timber: A Western Adventure Novella Introducing Jake Dukes’

 

A brand new Timber adventure… introducing a new character! This is the first time Timber will work with Jake Dukes! Are you ready to ride with these two gun-toting cowboys?

So, Marshal Timber has been tracking a gang of train-robbin’ outlaws. Eleven of ’em. Too many to handle on his own. He calls in the services of Jake Dukes, known for his brawn, amazing marksmanship, and ruthlessness. Together, they track the gang, but will they be able to bring them to justice before they get fired upon themselves?

Other Western adventures with Jake Dukes are available on Amazon! Purchase your copy by clicking here!

Sep 21

Forum Featuring Jim Burnett: An Exclusive Interview With One Of The Top Western Authors Of Today!

 

 

 

 

 You can read the original interview by clicking here!

When — and why — did you first fall in love with Westerns?

I grew up riding and showing horses, so anything with a horse in it interested me as a kid then, and it still does today. I’m crazy about horses. I love the West, the beautiful landscapes steeped in rich history, the cowboy garb of hats and boots, chaps, guns, spurs, saddles, and bridles, and the cowboy code that represents character. Even when I put my belt on each day, sometimes I imagine I’m strapping on a gun belt with a Colt in the holster. For me, Westerns embody the simple and meaningful way of life. That is perhaps why it is imperative for me, now, to travel out West every year. It’s become an annual pilgrimage where I find peace and serenity and so much of my inspiration for writing. Something stirs deep inside of me when I’m out West on the back of a horse working cattle in the high country or just sitting and drinking in the landscape.

Who are your three favorite Western writers?

I came upon the writings of Les Savage Jr. several years ago and fell in love with his style. Tragically, he died as a young man, yet his stories live on. Louis L’Amour and Zane Grey, the big guns among the Western writers, are also favorites. They left some mighty big boots to fill.

Which Western do you wish you’d written?

My all time favorite Western is “Lonesome Dove.” I believe Larry McMurtry captured the true essence of the cowboy way of life — their tenacious pioneer spirit, their dreams, and also their unyielding resolve to overcome any and all obstacles to reach their destination. Each character in this epic Western is well-developed. McMurtry has you feeling as if you are riding along with Gus and Woodrow to the wilds of Montana, crossing rivers, pushing through sand storms, snow and rain, and having the guts to do what no man has ever done.

What is the most recent Western you’ve read?

Just a few months back I read Louis L’Amour’s “Valley of the Sun.” I’ve recently purchased a set of short stories by L’Amour and plan to savor and enjoy them.

The “Desert Island” question. What are your three favorite Western books?

“The Wild Horse,” “The Rider of Lost Creek” and “Old Yeller.”

What are your three favorite Western movies?

Wow, now that’s a challenge to limit it to three. I am a huge Jimmy Stewart fan and love every one of his Westerns. “Night Passage” with Jimmy and Audie Murphy is one of my favorites. “The Man From Laramie” and “Bend of the River” are two others I have enjoyed the many, many times I have watched them.

Of the books you’ve written, which is your favorite — and why?

My favorite book to date is the third book in my “Caller’s Spring” series, titled “Horse Creek Trading Post.” It chronicles the life, faith and travel of a Quaker family by the name of Reese who sailed from Wales to America and began a homestead in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee. Then another generation moved on further west and began a trading post at Horse Creek, Wyoming, where God did many amazing things through this pioneer family. These men and women had spines of steel and the faith of the Old Testament patriarchs that inspire me and spur me on.

What is the most recent Western you’ve written?

My latest novel, “The Bible and the Badge,” has just come out. It is about twin Quaker brothers, Lucas and Levi Reese, who answer the call from God to be lawmen on the Kansas frontier. They wear their badges and tote their guns under the authority of God. It is a Western salute to our brave men and women of law enforcement and the military who lay down their lives every day to protect ours.

Can you tell us anything about your next book?

I’m writing a new Western adventure that will be a tribute to one-of-a-kind evangelist, Billy Graham. I’ll be sharing more details about this action-led new novel soon.

If you could go back in time, what would be the time and place in the Old West you’d like to have lived in for a year?

The setting of my “Caller’s Spring” series is Horse Creek, Wyoming. This past summer I spent a week on my friend’s 64,000-acre ranch, which is located there. I marveled at the amount of history the ranch encapsulates. Therefore, I believe I would have liked to live there around the late 1800s. The mountain ranges are spectacular: Powell Mountain, The Hogback, Ragged Top and many more.

Is there a question you wish I’d asked? The answer?

Why do you write? That question is kind of like asking someone why he or she breathes. Why he or she eats. Why he or she blinks. Writing for me is natural. It’s necessary. It’s fulfilling, and it’s addictive. Since I have been tapping on my computer keys and putting my stories on paper, I have never stopped marveling at the reaction of readers. To know that my words have the ability and power to move their emotions is amazing. Through a story, I can help transport people virtually to a place and time they might not otherwise ever be able to visit.

A second question I might have wanted you to ask is, “Why do you write Christian Western novels and short stories?” I want people to know that there is a God who loves them like crazy and has a plan for each and every one of us. The Lord has changed my life in so many ways, and through my writing, I want people to know that nothing is impossible with God. I refer to my novels as “The Gospel in a Cowboy Wrapper.” My writings, however, are not religion in your face. They are about believable characters going through real circumstances in life. My literary works are heavily influenced by my upbringing and my 30 years in the ministry.

JIM BURNETT PAYS TRIBUTE TO THE PEACE OFFICERS

WITH HIS LATEST BOOK

THE BIBLE AND THE BADGE

 

 

DOWNLOAD YOUR COPY TODAY

BY CLICKING HERE!

Sep 20

Hot, New And Available! Brand New Releases From Outlaws Publishing! Great Western Releases Readers Are Already Enjoying!

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Jedediah Beech was born during 1798 in Surry County, North Carolina. He was the fourth of six children born to Jeremiah and Martha (Butler) Beech. Both of his grandfathers were veterans of the American Revolutionary War. When Jedediah was 11 years old, his father moved the family across the Appalachian Mountains to the western foothills near Maryville, Tennessee, to start a new life on the wild and exciting frontier.

It was there that Jedediah’s saga began. Click on the cover to purchase your copy.

 

The story of Jericho James and his horse, Lucky is about a man who left his hometown of, Parkersburg, West Virginia in search of wealth and stability. Jericho set his plans on California and the gold fields, or whatever takes his fancy. The year is 1916. Jericho is telling his grandchildren of his life in 1876 when he was 24 years old. Jericho, at the time of his telling, is 65 years old. It is also a story inside a story.

While Jericho is telling his story to his grandchildren, they interrupt the story to ask questions, or make a comment of what they just heard. The story jumps back and forth from their present day of 1916 to 1876 in Jericho’s story telling. The Jericho James saga is a four book series. Each book contains the story of Jericho James and his horse, Lucky as he travels across America. Click on the cover to purchase your copy.

 

I slowly pull my .54 caliber, percussion cap, Hawken rifle from the leather scabbard hanging on the right side of my saddle. A quick glance to the cap, it’s set tight. Take two steps in front of my ground hitched horse. The movements of the tail are slowing. Has the cougar seen me? Or is he simply waiting on the unsuspecting calf?
Seating the butt into the pocket of my shoulder, I make out the body in the grass. Looking for a head or a shoulder. He’s taken a small step ahead. The shoulder is exposed. Sounds of the cattle fade. Pulling back the hammer, then waiting…now. As the cat is taking a step, the shoulder is clear of the grass and all obstructions. Pulling the trigger. The cap explodes, quickly igniting the black powder charge. The familiar push back to the shoulder. I hear a buzzing in my ears after the thunder of the shot. The black cloud of spent black powder clears away in the steady breeze. Click on the cover to purchase your copy.

 

Shorty was wounded and had lost more than a dab of blood. He was slouched over in his saddle as he rode into Holbrook, Arizona. In front of him tied to their saddles were the Collins brothers. He slid from the saddle in front of the sheriff’s office. Tying Dunnie he told Jody and Jim to get down. ‘Can’t, we’re tied to the saddle horn.”
Shorty didn’t untie the ropes, just cut them with his knife. They dismounted and walked inside. A deputy jumped to his feet. “What’er you doing’ with Jody an’ Jim?”
“Where’s the sheriff?”
“Gone over to Page.”
“I’m lockin’ these fellers up for a spell.”
“Yer in the wrong town Master. This is Frank Collins’ town an’ them are his sons.”
“Are you gonna help er get in the way?”
“Only help I’ll give is get you the doctor, if you don’t pass out first.” Out the door he ran as Shorty locked the boys up and sat down behind the desk.

Click on the cover to purchase your copy.

 

“Colonel Samford, please advise President Houston that they’re ready,” Dreka said to the three men who had been playing cards.
The three men stood up and walked over to the stairs. Colonel Charley Samford nodded to Dreka and headed up the steps as the other two incognito soldiers stood guard below. A few moments later, Sam Houston followed the Colonel and Billy back downstairs.
“Mister President, let me introduce you to Major Morehead of the Reconcilers and Major Graves of the Monitors,” Dreka announced.
“Outstanding job, Sergeant Dreka. Your plan worked out splendidly. We’ll take it from here. I’ll send for you later,” Houston said with a smile as he patted Dreka on the shoulder.
“Anything for you, Mister President,” Dreka responded as he nodded toward Brady and Billy.

Click on the cover to purchase your copy.

Sep 20

Hot, New Western Releases From Dusty Saddle Publishing! Have You Tried All Of These Great Westerns?

This is the first book in a brand new Western series. “The Timber U.S. Marshal Chronicles Western Series” pulls together tales from some of the best Western authors of today.

Joel Roberts hated the fact that he had been a sniper during the Civil War. He had given up his study of law to do his bit in what he thought would be a short conflict. He didn’t realize that the return to his home would show him how the divide of the country had destroyed all that he had fought for. The only thing he felt he could do was find the one woman he had missed over the years of slaughter. Mounted on his outstanding stallion, Ghost, he begins his search for his lady, which leads to continual conflict with evil. He turns into the devil that no one wants to cross. His journey allows him to develop many strange friendships, the most important of which is with Brutus, his dog. They travel endless miles, facing continual threats, and finds that neither can survive without the other.

Grab this new Fred Staff adventure, marking the first in a series, today—you won’t regret it!

 

The new, exciting novel from GP Hutchinson! This is the west as you’ve never experienced it before. A bushwhacked Wild-West-show entrepreneur must prove he’s no mere dime-novel hero; either that or lose everything he holds dear.

Cimarron Jack Wheatley is just wrapping up a tremendously successful first tour with his very own highly acclaimed “Real Wild West Extravaganza” when his show is stricken by a rapid succession of oddly coincidental setbacks—injuries, formerly satisfied troupe members suddenly quitting, and then a catastrophic train wreck. It soon becomes apparent that Jack isn’t simply experiencing a run of bad luck. Someone aims to ruin the business he has invested his entire life into—and to end his life if he puts up a fight. Now, everything that Cimarron Jack is supposed to have represented as a symbol of Wild West heroism in the show, he must actually be, in the deadly reality of chasing down answers and outlaws.

 

 

In this new, exciting Western novel from David Watts—you’ll find all the Wild West adventure you could want!

Jake and Galen are old friends but have been separated for ten years while Galen, a Texas Ranger, chases outlaws. Looking for a change in his life, Galen finds Jake serving as the sheriff of Possum Trot, Texas and decides to set up shop as the medical man in the town. But there’s a big problem. Horse Diggins, the evil owner of the Angel Dust Saloon, has set out to control the town by any means possible. Lines are drawn and the conflicts run deep. The town becomes a stage for the unpredictable and uncharitable actions of humans as portrayed by gunslingers, whores, a gun-toting parson, and bandits that just keep on showing up. The family businesses become targets, the daughters objects of abuse, and it is up to the sheriff and his old friend to keep the peace and render justice. Inevitably, the tensions spiral out of control until, to clear the air, there is a huge gunfight that will determine whether good or evil will prevail.

Grab this new Western novel from David Watts—you loved his novel “The Guns of Pecos County,” you thrilled to the sequel “The Long Ride.” Now ride with Watts as he takes you on “Possum Trot.” Currently on PRE-ORDER!

 

A Western collection from Scott Harris, adventures you won’t want to miss!

Scott Harris, author of “Mojave Massacre,” “Coyote Canyon,” “Coyote Creek,” “Bonanza,” “Tales From Dry Springs,” and many others is now the star of his own book—these are the adventures of a cowboy called Scott Harris as he fights for law, order, and the United States of America.

Fred Staff, Justin Harris, Douglas R. Cobb, David Watts, Jim Burnett, Arlo Flynn, and many others come together to write the adventures of Harris—exciting, gun-toting, action-packed stories—stories you will love, time and time again!

Law, order and punishment, the settling of the Old West—the birth of America—the taming of the wild frontier—these are the stories of Scott Harris. Grab this new Western collection, and ride into the sunset reading great adventures written especially for you.

 

 

In Cherokee Parks’ second book in the Colt’s Justice series, Parks expands further on the life of Colt Raines, a Confederate veteran trained in the art of dealing death that all began with the short story Colt’s Justice: Almost Home. Although now a peaceful rancher with a wife and children, and small place in East Texas, his skills and sense of right and wrong are still in high demand, bringing yet another individual in need of his unique talents. A one-time outlaw who turned to the ministry, thanks to a bullet from Colt’s Sharps rifle, comes seeking help for his entire congregation. Recommendations from friends in the San Angelo area prompt Colt to finally accept the request. Another friend, bounty hunter Bill Carson, decides to delay away his hunt for lawbreakers and include himself in this fight for justice.

Colt and Bill are joined by the Reverend Obadiah Mills, who choses to strap on his guns one more time, as well as other old friends who join the fight once they arrive in San Angelo. More unexpected help shows up, somewhat complicating the search for justice, but the newcomers prove their worth almost immediately as they pursue more than one batch of outlaws. The closer they get to their targets, the more blood is shed, and the more complicated things get as they find out there are outside forces at work. When all is said and done, there turns out to be enemies among their allies. But Colt Raines, the relentless pursuer, get to the bottom of the barrel and digs out the last rotten apple, bringing justice to the people of West Texas.

 

 

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