Nov 24

Holiday Products From Judy Mastrangelo

Are you looking for something special this Christmas? Why don’t you check out some of the great products currently for sale by artist and author Judy Mastrangelo. You can check out her FANTASTIC new holiday products by clicking right here. Act quickly though… These products may sell out quickly… If you like what you see… grab it!

If you want to learn more about Judy Mastrangelo you can check out her website right here.

Oct 25

How Bestseller Baugher Turned His New Hit Western Into A Blockbuster Motion Picture

With “C-Bar” from Mark Baugher currently climbing towards the top 100… I thought it might be useful for me to share one of Marks articles for “Westerner” magazine with you all. This is the story of how Mark Baugher made his book into a movie. A real movie. You can learn more about “C-Bar” by clicking here.

Mark BaugherI told you last month that I would talk about the money needed to make a movie. What if I told you it costs $250,000 to make a movie, would you believe that? Truth is I have no idea. I was talking with an English filmmaker about how we made this movie. He said the story of making the movie is as good as the movie itself. Let’s see what you think.

In my movie making experience, I had everything line up and fall in my lap. Patrick Ball, the cinematography and directing genius, called me wanting to further his career. He and his crew used the C-Bar movie as proof that they know what they are doing. Since making C-Bar, they have all gone forward with their careers, from opening their own companies to working in Hollywood. Like I said last month, the secret to success is surrounding yourself with the right people.

The locations are everywhere if you live in Arizona. Most of the actors are Western re-enactors. They gather up on weekends and do skits for the tourism trade. They had the needed costumes. I just called the groups and put the word out, and they came. The leading lady I needed had to be young, beautiful and a good horsewoman. I was walking through a feed store and saw Robin talking with someone she knew. I looked her over. Here stood a young, blond, beautiful woman with a big belt buckle. I knew that from this chance meeting she was the perfect woman to fill the role. I just walked up to her and asked if she wanted to be in a movie. Luckily, my wife was with me. I gave her my novel. She called three days later, telling me that she has been the Jessie Lynn character all her life. She would do the part.

Most of the props came from thrift stores. But what about that big problem of insurance? We were an all-amateur group making a movie. My personal liability coverage covered us. Shooting in the national forest was not an issue. I checked with them and they said as long as we were not a commercial organization, there was no problem.

With all we had available to us, the next big hurdle was showing the people involved that they were part of a viable production. There were people doubting what they were getting into. Their doubts vanished after the first shoot. We had a good script. Patrick and his crew were professionals. I made sure everyone enjoyed the experience.

From that day on, it got more and more fun to be a part of. Over eight months, we shot thirty-eight days. I worked seven days a week for that eight months, pulling everything together. Was it work? I guess so. Was it fun? It was the most fun time of my life. I think that writing novels is fun, but it pales in comparison to the excitement of movie making. I would do it again just for the fun. Wouldn’t even care if I got paid.

We are working on another episode. It’s written. The actors are in place and the locations are lined up.  C-Bar is ranked at 35 at this time on Amazon. Are you ready for your homework? Go to Amazon movies. If you are a Prime member, just click on the movie and at the end, leave us a review. Reviews are very important for growth. If you are not a Prime member, you can sign up for a thirty-day free trial. Just click here to see “C-Bar” on Amazon Prime!

Next month, I will tell you about our premiere and the amazing things that followed. The kind of amazing that I still can’t believe happened.

P.S.  The movie cost nothing to make.

C-Bar: The Guns of The C-Bar Ranch: The Law of the West: A Western Adventure (The C-Bar Ranch Western Adventure Series Book 1) by [Baugher, Mark, Watts, David]

You can also find Mark Baugher’s bestselling “C-Bar” on Amazon. It’s hurtling towards the top 100! Catch your own copy today by clicking here. Follow Mark’s fantastic column, alongside other great content, each month in Westerner magazine by visiting www.westernermagazine.com.

 

 

 

 

Sep 25

Art Prints and Other Products by Judy Mastrangelo ~ #2 ~ FANTASY

Are you looking for something special this year? Why don’t you check out some of the great products currently for sale by artist and author Judy Mastrangelo. Act quickly though… These products may sell out quickly… If you like what you see… grab it! You can see these great products here.

Sep 11

Art Prints and Other Products by Judy Mastrangelo #1 ~ ELVES AND FAIRIES

Are you looking for something special this year? Why don’t you check out some of the great products currently for sale by artist and author Judy Mastrangelo. You can check out her FANTASTIC new products. Act quickly though… These products may sell out quickly… If you like what you see… grab it! You can see these great products here.

Jun 30

The First Step Towards Making Your Western Sell….

With the resounding success of Paul L. Thompson, Robert Hanlon, Fred Staff and many other Western authors, we are starting to see just how popular Westerns are still today. Maybe it’s a dose of traditional values, or a desire for high octane action… but Westerns are definitely here to stay. Yet there are still hundreds of Western authors who believe their books will never sell or will never be popular. Yesterday, I was listening to a radio show interview with an author who has seen little success. He was asked during his interview, “Would you prefer to write Westerns or thrillers?” He said, “The thrillers sell better. Westerns just don’t sell, but I prefer the Westerns.” I almost choked on my caffeine fix when I heard that. The coffee spilled, and I ran to my inbox to get in touch with him. That error had to be corrected.

As I write this, Mr. Paul L. Thompson is currently riding high with several dozen of his Western books. Each new release goes dutifully into the top 100 along with Robert Hanlon, C. Wayne Winkle, Fred Staff, Clint Clay, John D. Fie, Jr., and all the other names who were once considered “non-sellers.” Millions of pages of Western books are read each day. Just look at the way they move… There’s nothing worse than hearing a Western author cheat themselves out of success. Yes. Cheat themselves. Because unless you know the success your book can have, you can’t aim for success.

So, can you imagine the state I was in after hearing that author’s answer? I’ll tell you—the secret is out of the bag. Westerns sell. Sell. Sell. Sell. Westerns have a great chance at being successful. Top level Western authors are making a living writing Westerns. The middle level is having a good time making extra money. That can’t be said of many other genres. Westerns keep selling and will keep selling.

You have a Western. You sold three or four copies last month. You’re about to give up writing. You have that half-finished manuscript that you don’t feel you should finish as nobody will ever read it. You’re in a state, too. Here’s what you’re going to do. You’re going to go look at Amazon and look at the top 100 bestselling Westerns. You’re going to see that people are buying those books. Those same people want to read your book. Now you know the score. You have an audience. Now you just have to place your book in front of that audience. That’s your only problem. The readership is there, the book is written, and you just have to put it in front of those people. How are you going to do it?

That’s the only problem you have. It’s a problem, but not as big of a problem as having to create a readership from scratch. Be a pioneer and come up with new ideas. Use well-trodden paths but keep your eye on the end goal—you want those readers to read your book. And, no, you don’t need a million dollars of advertising.

If you need help or advice, just holler. You can catch me through the contact form below. I’m going to spend the weekend recovering from the state that author’s answer left me in…

 

May 11

And They Said “100,000” Paid Pages Read Per Day For A Month Was Impossible…

Lately, I have noticed that people are still saying that there is no audience for Westerns. There’s just no audience. It’s just impossible to get Westerns read. People just don’t want to read them. Right? Wrong. I think it’s just about time you and I had another chat. Yes… you… you… I want to have a little private conversation with you. Right here. Right now, on this blog. Start heading in the right direction and read this article.

Let me start here: A few months ago, I met a married couple—it was the second time around for both of them. He is 71 and she is 67. “It’s impossible,” folks said—it’ll never last—and that’s what they said about a winning streak of 100,000 pages read per day. That’s one hundred thousand for those who would like clarification because it’s such a vast number. But how does someone top that number? Well… you go to 200,000 pages read per day. That’s the way forward, and that is what happened. I remember being on the phone with this author. “This can’t last,” he said. “I wouldn’t bet on it,” I replied. Instead of heading back down, those numbers just kept climbing, and climbing, and climbing… And what caused that? A magic fix? A rub of the magic Buddha? No. Continued, continual promotion—nothing wild, nothing bold, nothing crazy—but a continued plan that allows readers to find the book, allows an author to sit back and write—and allows me to keep proving the naysayers wrong. All I’m saying is… if it can be done here, it can be done there; and if you’re there, you should get to work putting together a strategy that will allow you to promote efficiently every single day.  What are you doing with your keywords? How are you advertising? How are you pricing your books? How are you taking advantage of the Kindle Pages Read program? How are you bringing in your readership?

Give it some thought, and keep in mind—the audience is there. Readers want Westerns. Readers want the best books they can get. I am going to keep telling you that the audience is right out there, waiting to read you. Really. There’s 200,000 pages per day of Westerns being read—and that’s just one author. Don’t you think those folks would like to read your book?

Don’t put importance on the wrong things. Start thinking about what you can do today to get your book seen by readers. What can you do? If you need some ideas, drop me an email in the little box below, and I can throw you some. It doesn’t take much to make a difference, but it does take the will and perseverance to just move in a different direction. Right? Ready? Go!

 

Apr 27

Burning Down The Barn With Western Author W.M. Montague

W.M. Montague has become of the surprise hit-makers of 2017. His first book “Blood on the Badge” has been rumbling around Amazon for a few weeks now… his second has just started to sell. The second Montague novel will take readers on the trail with a lawman. It’s a novel you are going to love… it’s called “Snakes Among The Cactus.”

But what makes a writer like W.M. Montague tick? There’s a great deal of speculation about that question… Some believe he has an inbuilt ability to write great stories. Some feel that he is a great interpreter of stories. Some feel that he’s just damn entertaining… Why don’t you make up your own mind… Let’s talk to Monty…

Why was it important for you to write? What drove that ambition?

It keeps me sane (sorta).  A number of things. 1. No longer able to work a “job,” boredom, and a hefty push by friends to “finish the damn thing.”

How closely do you try to keep to historical fact?

Depends on what I’m writing about.

What were the most influential movies on your writing?

The old classics of the thirties, forties, and fifties.

What first got you interested in the written word?

Not really sure. Maybe another outlet for my imaginative mind?

Would you ever write a book about the Alamo or other historical events?

Possibly.

Do you believe in good and bad? Is that a concept that all who write books should keep in mind?

Is life really so black and white as that? I mean, there is good in all humans, just as there is bad in us, as well. Good people do bad things, and a bad person can do good things.

If you could go back to any time period—where would you go?

That’s an interesting thought. A lot of folks wish for “the good old days,” but that’s a relative statement depending on when their “good old days” were. For me, I think that maybe either around the turn of the twentieth century, the mid to late thirties, or even the late forties would be an extraordinary time.

Can you describe all of your books in one easy-to-read answer?

I would be inclined to say they are fictional adventures into my imagination.

What will your next book be about?

A fictional Western of a vigilante Indian-raised preacher with a Bible and a six gun who’s not afraid to use either.

Do you think it’s important to have a large publisher as an author?

Not necessarily. Big publishers and such companies tend to overlook truly great works because they seem to be more interested in making the “quick buck” rather than actually taking the time to find out if the author’s work will have a following of loyal reader fans.

Are you ever surprised by how many readers there are, still, in the world?

Not really. Folks will always want to read. Their tastes may change, but people want to be entertained, and it’s a way to let their minds escape for a while.

Is there any kind of book you wouldn’t write, or couldn’t write?

Tech manuals

Do you think writers read more books than the average reader—or is that just a myth?

Not sure. I, myself, don’t read much—very little as a matter of fact. Occasionally, I will pick up a book and read it, but it has to hold me or I tire of it quickly.

How have reviewers treated your books?

Surprisingly well, considering I’m the “new kid on the block,” so to speak. For that, I want to thank everyone for such glowing statements.

And your luxury item to take to a secluded island is….?

My submersible yacht.

 

You can check out “Blood on the Badge” today from W.M. Montague by clicking here!

Apr 18

800,000+ Pages Read Later… And Those Readers Keep Reading…

 

800,000 PAGE READS LATER…

 

A few weeks ago now, I was talking to you all about the importance of recognizing a living, Western readership that is actively reading the books of Western authors around the world. I made some good friends from that post. But I also met some people who told me it was impossible to get over 100,000 Kindle pages read in a day with a Western book. Impossible.

Well…. I was talking to a Western author yesterday who I started working with last year. We have had some hard times getting his books moving. Yet, by keeping solid, consistent promotion, we started seeing some results. Some good days. Some bad days. But the good were outweighing the bad. This continued… until he broke through. He is not the only one breaking through, either. He was just the latest in an extensive line of authors breaking through the negative noise. He has been hitting the highs consistently over the last few weeks—but yesterday, he broke the 100,000 mark. Over one hundred thousand Kindle pages read of a Western in a single day. Think about that. And for those of you who said it was impossible—to those who said that people aren’t buying Westerns—open your eyes. Westerns are still some of the most popular books in town. My advice for those who are actively telling us all that Westerns don’t sell, I’ll quote the client who just did it. “Those folks don’t know their ass from their elbow. Seems to me that Western authors are the luckiest writers in the world with such a loyal following.”

Get to work on that promotional strategy, folks. This year is shaping up to be a huge one for the Western readership.

 

Apr 11

Proof That The Western Readership Lives On In Large Numbers….

A few weeks ago now, I was talking to you all about the importance of recognizing a living, Western readership that is actively reading the books of Western authors around the world. I made some good friends from that post. But I also met some people who told me it was impossible to get over 100,000 Kindle pages read in a day with a Western book. Impossible.

Well…. I was talking to a Western author yesterday who I started working with last year. We have had some hard times getting his books moving. Yet, by keeping solid, consistent promotion, we started seeing some results. Some good days. Some bad days. But the good were outweighing the bad. This continued… until he broke through. He is not the only one breaking through, either. He was just the latest in an extensive line of authors breaking through the negative noise. He has been hitting the highs consistently over the last few weeks—but yesterday, he broke the 100,000 mark. Over one hundred thousand Kindle pages read of a Western in a single day. Think about that. And for those of you who said it was impossible—to those who said that people aren’t buying Westerns—open your eyes. Westerns are still some of the most popular books in town. My advice for those who are actively telling us all that Westerns don’t sell, I’ll quote the client who just did it. “Those folks don’t know their ass from their elbow. Seems to me that Western authors are the luckiest writers in the world with such a loyal following.”

Get to work on that promotional strategy, folks. This year is shaping up to be a huge one for the Western readership.

 

Contact me if you want to know how to get your book seen. Contact me if you want to tell me I’m wrong. I’d love to hear from you and maybe even read your book. Heck… if I’m talking to dead people, I have plenty of time on my hands. Seriously.

 

 

Mar 29

Connecting With A Western Readership That Is Still Very Much Alive and Well…

Western authors arrange calls me with often and start with something along these lines: “I wrote this book called ______ and nobody is buying it. Nobody buys Westerns anymore. It’s so sad.”

I have to smile. I mean, you have to smile, don’t you? It’s one of those strange “certainties” that people are so sure of—Hollywood isn’t making Westerns anymore… so they must be dead, right?

Well, that’s not true. I was talking to a well-known middle of the road musician a few days ago, who explained that record companies are losing money every day of the week. Why? Because they don’t back middle of the road music stars and make albums with them. Guys like Andre Rieu, Peter Nero and the like are not encouraged by major labels—yet their records sell in the millions to people who enjoy listening to melodic music.

That’s how the Western is enjoyed these days. Hollywood has given up on it, and major publishers are avoiding publishing them. But authors are still writing Westerns, readers are still reading Westerns and small publishers are building huge corporations by publishing them. Just as Peter Nero still makes albums of piano music, and Andre Rieu tours the world and has become one of the biggest record sellers and touring attractions in the world. Who needs Hollywood and Madison Avenue?

Those Western authors who promote their books have a monopoly. These are authors who can hold a dozen or more positions on the bestseller charts. The unpromoted Western isn’t found—even though readers want them very badly. The same musician told me that when he signed his first contract with a record company, they would set aside hundreds of thousands of dollars to promote new talent. I know of only three smaller book companies that will put money into promotion. I know of few major publishing companies that promote responsibly. A press release on its own is not promotion—no matter what it says.

So, my point is this: How can you judge the size of an audience who can’t see your book, yet when a little bit of effort is put into promoting a book, that same audience jumps up and grabs it with both hands? The more you promote—the more your book is seen; and the more it is bought—the more it is seen and purchased by other readers.

Look at Paul L. Thompson. He currently holds seven positions in the top one hundred. He accounts for 7% of sales in the top one hundred bestselling Westerns in America. Did he get there by magic? No. His publisher believes in promotion. I promote his books. He sells because the audience sees him. We change his keywords, we send out mailers, we put him in front of Western readers. It’s the same with Mike Hundley, Alex Cord, Jeff Breland, G.P. Hutchinson, Texas John, Weldon Shaw, John D. Fie, Jr., Michael Haden, Cliff Roberts, Robert Hanlon, and a hundred other talented authors who probably account for 500,000 paid pages read of Western product each day of the week. That’s a chunk of change, and we aren’t even talking about sales yet. That’s just paid pages read on the KU program—a program most “publishers” avoid in favor of publishing on Smashwords. Yes—Smashwords.

So my next question is this: If the Western is dead, and the Western audience is dying—why are these authors doing so well? It’s not that they spend hundreds of thousands on advertising. It’s not that the audience is dead. It’s because they all promote reasonably, responsibly, and don’t give up.

Throw in all the multiple products you can put together. Audiobooks, paperbacks, box sets, and the like, and you have your own little industry growing.

It’s as simple as that.

Additionally, Randall Dale, D.G. Wyatt and Clint Clay will soon be joining them at the top of the tree. In fact, I bet we will see them there very quickly. You should check them out.

Okay, maybe I’m just griping here. The joy of writing is to write—but it pains me to hear that there’s no audience for Westerns. Why? Because if that audience is dead, then I’m spending a lot of time talking to dead people—and I ain’t no medium. I leave that to Andy Hopkins.

Contact me if you want to know how to get your book seen. Contact me if you want to tell me I’m wrong. I’d love to hear from you and maybe even read your book. Heck… if I’m talking to dead people, I have plenty of time on my hands.

 

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